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March 22, 2008
Press Release: GCS Research Wins ESRI 2008 ArcGIS Server Code Challenge

GCS Research Wins 2008 ArcGIS Server Code Challenge

GCS Research is pleased to announce that it has won the 2008 ArcGIS Server Code Challenge.  The award recognizes GCS Research for innovation in combining the geospatial analytical power of ArcGIS Server 9.2 technology with Google's Google Maps and Microsoft's Virtual Earth visualization applications.

In order to demonstrate the interoperability possibilities, GCS Research developed selection and buffering tools that allow users to query the State of Montana cadastral geodatabase, perform a simple buffer, and view the relevant land records associated with the parcel information.

The goal was to demonstrate the ability to leverage local, state, and federal investments in enterprise geodatabases, ArcGIS Server as an analytical GIS engine, and present query results within Google and Microsoft applications for mass consumption of essential land record information.

Mr. John Waterman, Vice-President of Geospatial Solutions for GCS Research, developed the application demonstrations based upon on-going work and expertise with ArcGIS Server as well as Microsoft's Virtual Earth and Google Maps.

"We are extremely honored to have received this award among the very stiff competition of the Code Challenge," states Dr. Alex Philp, President of GCS Research.  "John's work demonstrates a good, practical example of what is possible today given the various tools available for creative geospatial solutions.  Utlimately, we think this combination of multi-purpose geodatabases, server-side GIS engines like ArcGIS Server, combined with a variety of options for consumption, reporting, visualization, and basic functions will continue to grow in demand."

The award was announced at the conclusion of the ESRI Business Partner Conference in Palm Springs, California.

Currently, GCS Research is maintaining demonstration services of the solutions, and anyone is welcome to evaluate the Microsoft and Google performance of parcel selection and buffer tools against ArcGIS Server.  The demonstration sites are designed to provide proof of experience and do not reveal all the capabilities possible in terms of advanced analytical functions.

For more information on how these technologies and associated geodatabases can be leveraged for effective solutions for your organization, please contact Mike Beltz at GCS Research, 406-532-3254 or write info@gcs-research.comThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it.


March 20, 2008

GCS Research is pleased to announce that it has won the 2008 ArcGIS Server Code Challenge.  The award recognizes GCS Research for innovation in combining the geospatial analytical power of ArcGIS Server 9.2 technology with Google's Google Maps and Microsoft's Virtual Earth visualization applications.

In order to demonstrate the interoperability possibilities, GCS Research developed selection and buffering tools that allow users to query the State of Montana cadastral geodatabase, perform a simple buffer, and view the relevant land records associated with the parcel information. 

The goal was to demonstrate the ability to leverage local, state, and federal investments in enterprise geodatabases, ArcGIS Server as an analytical GIS engine, and present query results within Google and Microsoft applications for mass consumption of essential land record information.

Mr. John Waterman, Vice-President of Geospatial Solutions for GCS Research, developed the application demonstrations based upon on-going work and expertise with ArcGIS Server as well as Microsoft's Virtual Earth and Google Maps.

"We are extremely honored to have received this award among the very stiff competition of the Code Challenge," states Dr. Alex Philp, President of GCS Research.  "John's work demonstrates a good, practical example of what is possible today given the various tools available for creative geospatial solutions.  Utlimately, we think this combination of multi-purpose geodatabases, server-side GIS engines like ArcGIS Server, combined with a variety of options for consumption, reporting, visualization, and basic functions will continue to grow in demand."

The award was announced at the conclusion of the ESRI Business Partner Conference in Palm Springs, California. 

Currently, GCS Research is maintaining demonstration services of the solutions, and anyone is welcome to evaluate the Microsoft and Google performance of parcel selection and buffer tools against ArcGIS Server.  The demonstration sites are designed to provide proof of experience and do not reveal all the capabilities possible in terms of advanced analytical functions.

For more information on how these technologies and associated geodatabases can be leveraged for effective solutions for your organization, please contact Mike Beltz at GCS Research, 406-532-3254 or write info@gcs-research.com

 


March 18, 2008

http://www.geoconnexion.com/uploads/digitalwatermannnrking_intv7i3.pdf


March 18, 2008
Press Release: GeoMarc Featured in Geoconnexion International Magazine

Digital Watermarking for Imagery GeoMarc

Digital Watermarking Embeds Ownership Details and Metadata Intelligence into Image Pixels

With the explosive proliferation of web-based portals for hosting, viewing and disseminating remote sensing imagery, digital watermarking has emerged as one of the most valuable – and versatile – new technologies introduced to the geospatial industry in recent years. This technology is now being used commercially to protect image licensing rights and exploit metadata

“Once an aerial photograph or satellite image is made available on the Internet, it’s often difficult to determine when it was acquired, where it came from, and who owns the rights to it,” said Mike Beltz, Vice President of Marketing and Sales for GCS Research in Missoula, Montana, USA. “This loss of ownership and metadata information can cause problems for both the person who uses it and the organization that created it.

As concerns over digital copyright and metadata intelligence issues began growing in the geospatial community, GCS Research licensed digital watermarking technology from Digimarc Inc., a provider of secure identification solutions in Beaverton, Oregon, USA. That firm had originally developed the technology to protect professional stock photography from being pirated off the Internet. GCS Research substantially modified the technology for use with geospatial image data and introduced the GeoMarc line of digital watermarking solutions in 2005

“This technology provides a set of tools to embed an imperceptible watermark into the pixels of a satellite image or air photo,” said Beltz. “This watermark payload carries critical pieces of metadata that are seared into the pixels and remain intact through the life of the image.”

To read the full article, please download the PDF.